You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘History’ tag.

We had a chance to see the El Galeón today. The ship is an authentic replica of a 16th century galleon that was part of Spain’s West Indies fleet. At 170-foot and 495 ton – it is pretty impressive!

Advertisements

Looking back…

In the summer of 2013 we planned a day-trip to Mansfield (MO) in search of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Historic Homestead.  The drive itself was rather memorable as we found ourselves alongside Amish buggies.

The farmhouse that Laura and Almanzo built still stands – frozen in time. A calendar on the wall from the 1950s is a reminder that although times have changed, somethings should remain the same for posterity. Learning about their life and struggles makes you appreciate American willpower. They crossed the country in a wagon with a hundred dollars stashed in a box and made a new life for themselves in Missouri. That very box can be viewed at the museum located on the property.

Most people have heard of the “Little House” series, either through the books and later TV show. Yet most do not realize that Laura Ingalls Wilder did not begin writing down her stories until her daughter Rose encouraged her to. A little corner nook by their bedroom contains a small writing desk where she wrote her stories on paper tablets.

Now, a few generations later, we are reading her stories on electronic tablets. 🙂

Photo by H.S. Cooper ©

Photo by H.S. Cooper © The USS LEXINGTON

If you are in Corpus Christi (Texas), plan on visiting the USS Lexington. The Lexington, an Essex Class aircraft carrier, was commissioned in 1943. She was nicknamed the “Blue Ghost” by Tokyo Rose because of several reports of being sunk. At the time of her decommission in 1991, she was the oldest working carrier in the U.S. Navy.

There are five self-guided tours, each beginning and ending on the hangar deck. From aircraft, exhibits, movie theater, cafe and gift shop, be prepared to spend a day on board. One of the hidden gems we found was a ball cap (of the Lexington) worn by Commander Jerry Linenger on board the Space Shuttle Discovery in 1994.

Admission is $14 for adults and $12 for seniors. Gated parking across the street is $3.50 and requires a token at exit (which you pay for at Admissions). There is no RV parking, so only take your tow vehicle. There is free shuttle service from the pier to the hangar deck.   The tour consists of a great deal of walking and climbing – sturdy shoes are recommended. And don’t forget your camera!

 

Over the years we’ve had our own unexplained ghostly adventures… like our time spent at Bodie State Historic Park (CA). Bodie is a modern-day ghost town. When the California State Park system took over Bodie, it left all the buildings as they stood. This is one of the most unforgettable places we have ever been. There is so much history there it consumes you. You can almost feel towns folk walking along the street beside you. Peering through windows you feel invisible eyes staring back. It is a must-see for anyone visiting the Eastern Sierras.

Another place to note is Wilson’s Creek National Battlefield (MO). This was the first major Civil War battle west of the Mississippi. The park is a five-mile driving tour and you are literally driving back through time. In fact, at one point I think I really did! I had gotten out of the truck at one stop to take a photo of two cannons in a field and when I walked past the first cannon I was overcome with chills. I assumed it was from stepping out of the air-conditioning into the ninety-plus degree heat. But after I took a photo of the farthest cannon, I walked back to the first and I got chills and goosebumps again. I stepped toward the cannon to take a photo and swear I heard someone shout “NO” in my ear. Boy, did I hustle myself back to the safety of the Silverado!

Although we have visited Pensacola Lighthouse (FL) several times, we returned to visit last year to see the lighthouse decorated for Christmas. Even though the lighthouse is haunted, I didn’t see the Ghost of Christmas Past – but I did feel a section of cool air as I entered the Keeper’s room. The last time I visited there had a similar experience in that area. And on the previous visit I had also felt someone watching me in the basement. So even after telling myself I wasn’t going in the basement this last visit, I did. However, they had a clothed dummy sitting at the desk at the base of the stairs and it startled me so much I jumped backwards onto the steps again!

Then there was the time we planned a trip to see Appomattox Court House National Historic Park (VA). Those a little dusty with their history may recall the name but not the significance of the location. This was the surrender grounds, where Generals Lee and Grant put an end to the Civil War. The building where this historic moment occurred, the McLean House, still stands. After touring the house we went outside to one of the other buildings. No sooner had we stepped through the doorway when we found ourselves quickly stepping back outside. Hard to explain why we all got goosebumps, but it just felt very wrong in there. We resumed our tour of the park and enjoyed the other buildings without problem. At least for a little while…I have a tendency to lag behind as I read every plaque and take a number of photos. We were visiting the new jail and the other two were already heading outside while I was alone upstairs. I was snapping a few photos of the window when I felt a chill. Looking down I saw I had goosebumps again. I shrugged it off until I heard a cough come from the cell. Then I headed down the stairs as quickly as I could!

But the eeriest thing happened just a few weeks ago while touring the USS Alabama (AL). The battleship is about seven hundred feet long from stem to stern and if you take the self-guided tours it will take about two hours. Parts of the ship were rather warm and stuffy and I quickly found myself finishing the tour alone. Although there were other people touring the ship, I managed to always stay a room or two apart. I was getting a little dehydrated and just poked my head in a few rooms to quickly finish that section of the tour. As I looked in one room, an officer’s quarters I believe, I noted the typewriter on the desk and was about to head to the next room when I heard the sound of an old typewriter. It was just two keystrokes. My first thought was that another room nearby had some sort of voiced display and a visitor had activated it. So I quickly continued with the tour. But after I finished that section of the tour, I saw there was nothing like that. Where did that distinctive sound come from?

Sometimes when you visit historic sites you get more awareness of history than you paid admission for… 😉

If you have ever been traveling on I-10 through Alabama, then you have probably seen the USS Alabama as you crossed Mobile Bay. Next time you are in the area, make sure you have time to stop and visit this amazing ship and all the exhibits at Battleship Memorial Park.

The battleship is huge! It is just under 700 feet long from stem to stern and if you take all three self-guided tours (red, green and yellow) it will take you two hours. And believe me, after you tour the USS Alabama, you can skip the gym for a week… or two! It requires a great deal of climbing to tour the entire ship. There are some great exhibits on board and one item to note is a piece of the USS Arizona.

After you tour the battleship there is a path that leads to the aircraft pavilion. Inside are several exhibits, including a piece of brick from the 9/11 attack on the Pentagon. Also on the property is the USS Drum, which is the oldest American submarine on display in the world. This submarine is actually on land and you have to go up several flights of stairs to tour it. Make sure you save some energy to tour the USS Drum because it well worth it!

The property also includes a gift shop and small restaurant. Outside exhibits vary – from aircraft to tanks. There is a nice picnic area along the bay, as well as a pier.

The cost of admission to tour the USS Alabama, USS Drum and aircraft pavilion  is $15 for adults and $13 for seniors. Parking is $2 to enter Battleship Memorial Park. There is adequate RV parking. If you don’t have the time to tour the vessels or can’t walk/climb, you can pay the nominal parking fee and still see them from the park.

For more additional information and hours, you can visit their website at: http://www.ussalabama.com/visitor_info.php

Photo by H.S. Cooper ©

Photo by H.S. Cooper © Fort McHenry National Monument

If you find yourself near Baltimore, don’t forget to take a day to visit Fort McHenry National Monument by the harbor. The fort and grounds have a fascinating history… and the Battle of Baltimore in 1814 was the inspiration for Francis Scott Key to write the Star-Spangled Banner!

Entrance into the fort is $7 per adult; children under 15 are free. You can visit the park without paying admission – although you will only have access to the picnic grounds, visitor’s center, gift shop and movie.

Now the area is not Big Rig friendly, so don’t even think about taking your RV! If you are staying in the area you can take the water taxi or drive (but follow directions carefully as there is a great deal of traffic).

For directions and additional information, please visit their website at: http://www.nps.gov/fomc/index.htm

Photo by H.S. Cooper © Fort Barrancas drawbridge

Photo by H.S. Cooper © Fort Barrancas drawbridge

If you find yourself near Pensacola (FL) make sure you plan a day for Fort Barrancas. The fort is actually part of the Gulf Islands National Seashore, however, it is located on the Pensacola Naval Air Station. Admission to the fort is free, although citizens need to show proper photo ID at the entrance gate.

Fort Barrancas has a fascinating history. A shot fired by a guard at the fort on January 8, 1861 is sometimes considered the very first shot of the American Civil War! The fort and other structures there were built by different groups over time. There is a great deal of history to step into… or see-through… did I mention the Confederate ghost? 😉

The area also consists of the Spanish Water Battery (Bateria de San Antonio) which has an underground passage from the fort. The tunnel section from the fort to the water battery is very dark and steep, so make sure you are wearing sturdy shoes. The fort itself is very dark in sections and you may want to carry a flashlight with you while exploring. The Spanish Water Battery has several steps going up (although you don’t need to climb them to appreciate the view).

There are also trails and a picnic area near the visitor center. And an additional treat is the view at the Overlook of Fort Pickens on Santa Rosa Island across Pensacola Bay!

A short distance down the road is the Advanced Redoubt. The Redoubt is unique for the time period because it was designed solely for resisting a land-based assault.

Parking at the fort is limited; however, there is a small area dedicated for RV/bus parking. The fort and visitor center is only open on Saturdays. The Advanced Redoubt has more parking and is open daily. Tours of Fort Barrancas and the Advanced Redoubt are scheduled on Saturdays.

For more information visit: http://www.nps.gov/guis/planyourvisit/fort-barrancas.htm and https://hscooper.wordpress.com/photos/florida/national-museum-of-naval-aviation/

 

You just never know what kind of history you are going to dig up (hmm… poor choice of words, perhaps!) at a cemetery. Like the time we were gold panning along the Yuba River (CA) and found a small trail leading to a cemetery. The small cemetery revealed to be the resting place of a Captain Thompson and his descendents – a ship’s captain until his crew abandoned ship for the promise of riches in California’s gold fields. And there are those with a voiceless past, like the Yuma Territorial Prison Cemetery (AZ) where there are no grave markers, just rows of rock mounds… It really is amazing what you can learn at these locations. So why not plot… uh, I mean plan, a trip to visit a historic one near you?

Photo by H.S. Cooper ©

Photo by H.S. Cooper © WCNB

If you find yourself traveling along I-44 between Springfield and Joplin (MO), consider making a day trip to Wilson’s Creek National Battlefield. Wilson’s Creek was actually the first major Civil War battle fought in the West. The battlefield remains preserved and visitors can drive along the historic five mile route.

There are several hiking areas. Visitors who plan on hiking should be prepared with good shoes, bottled water and bug-tick repellant. Oh, and you may find yourself coming face-to-face with deer! 🙂

The entrance fee to Wilson’s Creek is $10 per vehicle (or $5 per visitor) and a gate token can be obtained at the Visitor’s Center. The Visitor’s Center also features a film, Civil war collection, library and gift shop.

For more information on this historic stop, visit their website at: http://www.nps.gov/wicr/index.htm

Photo by H.S. Cooper ©

Photo by H.S. Cooper © The Ray House

Photo by H.S. Cooper ©

Photo by H.S. Cooper © Cannon

Photo by H.S. Cooper ©

Photo by H.S. Cooper © Fort Toulouse Frontier Days

We had the opportunity to visit Fort Toulouse – Fort Jackson State Historic Site at the start of their annual five day Frontier Days event. The event is held every year in November.  In 1717, this region of Alabama was actually part of French Louisiana and a French fort was build along the junction of the two rivers. But there is more to it… let’s just say a lot of history from the Creek Indians, French, British and Americans… And it was definitely a great time to visit with period costumes and folks living “the life” for a few days!

Photo by H.S. Cooper ©

Photo by H.S. Cooper © Coosa River

The park does have a campground although it was closed during the Frontier Days event. The sites were very picturesque – under trees covered in Spanish moss and some sites were along the beautiful Coosa River.

To see over forty photos of the 2012 Frontier Days, please visit: https://hscooper.wordpress.com/photos/alabama/fort-toulouse-fort-jackson-shs-slideshow/

Additional information can be found at their website: http://preserveala.org/forttoulousejackson.aspx?sm=g_h

 

 

Photo by H.S. Cooper ©

Photo by H.S. Cooper © PMA Herb House

If you find yourself in Southern Alabama… maybe heading to Florida… along Highway 231 between Montgomery and Dothan, you definitely need to stop at the Pioneer Museum of Alabama.

This museum has over 18,000 artifacts and over twenty buildings on display – including a covered bridge!  The museum covers Alabama history – from the Southeastern Native Americans to early pioneers to the Victorian era to WWI. The main gallery area is themed and everything is labeled.  The museum also has several wonderful murals, including “The Crossing”, that is a must see! A wonderful museum for learning about the past.

Photo by H.S. Cooper ©

Photo by H.S. Cooper © PMA “The Crossing”

And an additional treat is the Moon Tree. The seeds of this Loblolly pine tree actually traveled to the Moon and back on Apollo 14 in 1971! How cool is that? ;)

The museum is only $6 for adults and $5 for seniors.  They are open five days a week and have adequate parking. For more information, visit their website at: http://www.pioneer-museum.org/

For a slideshow of over 100 photos, please visit my other page at TMN titled Pioneer Museum of Alabama (Slideshow).

Photo by H.S. Cooper ©

Photo by H.S. Cooper © PMA General Store

Photo by H.S. Cooper ©

Photo by H.S. Cooper ©

My absolute favorite stop in California is Bodie State Historical Park – it is a modern-day ghost town that has been left exactly the way it was. When the California State Park system took over Bodie, it left all the buildings as they stood.

Photo by H.S. Cooper ©

Photo by H.S. Cooper ©

Hwy 395 goes along the east-side of the Sierras. This route is definitely one of the most scenic drives you can experience in the mountains.  The drive to Bodie SHP is a rather long 18 miles off of the main road. There are warnings against taking recreational vehicles as there are limited parking spots and the road is very rough. The last three miles of the road is nothing but dirt and stone. This section of road is extremely rough. In fact, the heavy-duty toolbox in the bed of our pickup truck (which traveled tens of thousands of miles unfastened) moved from its spot almost 6 inches. So if you are traveling in a RV, you should park it at a local campground and make the trip in your tow vehicle.

Photo by H.S. Cooper ©

Photo by H.S. Cooper ©

The above photo is actually one of my favorites. I was looking in the school house and the reflection from the window revealed the beautiful scenery behind me and offered a view from the school’s other window to see buildings on the other side of the street. It was one of those past, present, future moments for me. 😉

Photo by H.S. Cooper ©

Photo by H.S. Cooper ©

This is one of the most unforgettable places I have ever been. There is so much history there, it consumes you. You can almost feel towns folk walking along the streets right beside you. It is a must-see for anyone visiting that region of California.

Photo by H.S. Cooper ©

Photo by H.S. Cooper ©

This place is absolutely amazing and the history of “the bad men from Bodie” is fascinating. If you find yourself headed to the east-side of Yosemite National Park, take the hour drive northward to Bodie SHP. You won’t be disappointed!

Photo by H.S. Cooper ©

Photo by H.S. Cooper ©

More photos can be seen at: https://hscooper.wordpress.com/photos/california/bodie-state-historical-park/

Flag at Appomattox

Flag at Appomattox

We are spending the summer in Virginia and recently visited Appomattox Court House National Historical Park. It was a beautiful summer day until a line of clouds veiled the sun and it began to rain.

As tourists scrambled for cover or made way for their vehicles, we dug out our folding umbrellas and continued our tour of what the locals refer to as “the surrender grounds”.

It was muddy and slippery, yet we reminded ourselves that conditions weren’t always “ideal” for those who died and fought for the freedoms that make America great.

So no matter what the weather, please have a safe Fourth of July and remember those who have fought and continue to fight for our freedoms.

Appomattox

Appomattox

Appomattox 

IN MY SITES: A Campground Mystery (Book #4)

In My Sites
In My Sites
A Campground Mystery
By HS Cooper
Photo book

DYING TO WORK CAMP (Book #3)

Dying to Work Camp
Dying to Work ...
A Campground Mystery
By HS Cooper
Photo book
Follow Three Modern Nomads on WordPress.com

Enter address to receive select posts via email. Please note, you must return to the site to see other content and updates.

THE PROPANE GAME (Book #2)

The Propane Game
The Propane Game
A Campground Myster...
By HS. Cooper
Photo book

Archived Posts

A ‘CLASS A’ STASH (Book #1)

A 'Class A' Stash
A 'Class A' Stash
A Campground Myster...
By HS. Cooper
Photo book
Help Veterans! The Veterans Site

Page Links

October 2017
S M T W T F S
« Nov    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031  

A THOUSAND WORDS: Photos from life on-the-road

Photos from life on...
By H.S. Cooper

ON THE ROAD TO DISASTER

On the Road to Disaster
On the Road to...
How to prepare for ...
By H.S. Cooper
Photo book