You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Motor Coach’ tag.

It’s a beautiful Sunday in Texas and we thought we would sit outside in our lawn chairs and read. A few of our fellow Full-Timers came over and started up a conversation that went from books to favorite flavors of ICEEs. Just a relaxing Sunday…so we thought.

We had been talking a few minutes when a woman walked up to the group and said, “How long are you folks staying?” We all replied a few more weeks. The woman said mumbled something about it must be nice to be on vacation that long, when one of the group members explained we were Full-Timers.

Now, imagine our surprise when she said, “Oh, well you’re trash from where I come from.” Then she walked away with disgust.

We were absolutely shocked. We all watched her walk away. No one said a thing. In fact, the only thing you could hear at the time was our jaws dropping.

Personally I thought that it was a joke. I looked around for cameras – surely someone was filming a hidden-camera show and we were the next skit? No, no cameras. The woman was for real.

She knew nothing about any of us, yet she blatantly called us trash. No, excuse me, she said we were trash.

I’m not a confrontational person, but this was rather upsetting to me that someone would make such a bold judgment and not even allow a response. I was curious and decided to see where this woman was from.

I saw her several sites down by a fifth-wheel – she was sitting on a lawn chair and drinking a can of soda. I never said anything to her but glanced at the pickup truck beside the rig and saw it had Texas license plates and several Austin stickers on the tailgate.

The group was still gathered near our site and several other Full-Timers had emerged to listen to the tale of the hit-and-run trash-talker.

I mentioned what I saw and one person said, “Oh, well, if they’re from Austin, that explains it.”

Well, I don’t quite understand what that means and find myself not really caring. I mean, why should I fall into the stereotype trap as this trash-talker?

As a Full-Timer I feel that we are a benefit to society. We bring money to local communities. From buying local produce and eating at local restaurants to visiting local attractions and attending local events – Full-timers are adding revenue to each area they visit.

They also help promote communities – they either tell other travelers or share their photos and stories online about the areas attractions and help increase tourism.

When staying in an area for an extended stay, many Full-Timers contribute to the community by volunteering their time or donating money or goods to local charities. I personally have over 350 hours of volunteer time – from the State of Florida to the State of Washington.

We are big on community. People in stick-houses go years (or decades) without knowing their neighbors. Full-Timers know their neighbors, be it for a day, a week or a year. We are there for our neighbors – we don’t ask for anything out of it. It’s just something we do to help our fellow RVers.

Full-Timers may not have stick-houses, but we do pay taxes. From Federal taxes to local sales taxes to toll road fees, we are paying our share to help keep the country running.

You will find that most Full-Timers are in support of parks and environmental-related causes. We help maintain our national and state parks by purchasing annual park passes and volunteering at them.  We contribute to eco-charities and causes and encourage others to do the same. Many of us pay fees or buy permits to hike, camp or fish areas – with the money going back into preserving these areas.

We have much smaller carbon footprints than those in stick-homes. Yes, we may put more mileage on, but we also take better care of our vehicles. Most Full-Timers are aware of their vehicles needs and constantly make sure they run as efficiently as possible. Those of us who need trucks to tow our fifth-wheels and travel trailers have newer diesels that run on bio-fuels. Those who have tow vehicles (“toads”) for their motorhomes or motorcoaches have hybrids or vehicles with a better gas mileage than standard vehicles.

Full-Timers live by the code – recycle, reduce, reuse. We recycle everything we can because if we can’t recycle it back into society it’s trash. We don’t like trash! Rarely will you see a Full-Timer with more than a tiny bag of trash. Reducing is automatic for us. Needless packaging and extra “stuff” is just a waste of space and energy to us. And we reuse like you wouldn’t believe! If we can’t reuse it ourselves, we’ll find a good home for it (often sharing it with other RVers or passing it on to a local charity).

Chevy Silverado

Chevy Silverado

We also buy American-made RVs and vehicles. Drive through any campground and you’ll see the overwhelming majority of fifth-wheels and travel trailers are being towed by GMCs, Chevys and Ford trucks. Toads vary, but favorites include Saturns, Jeeps and hybrids. We take great pride in our rigs and you can usually spot a Full-Timer by the blinding glare of polish on their RV. (Currently ours has 3 coats!)

And then there are those Full-Timers who rebuild or renovate RVs. These conversions are the ultimate in recycling, reducing and reusing! These folks use their know-how to take an older RV or bus and convert into something amazing. They buy local products and use local services to achieve their custom dream.

This is just a few of the many ways Full-Timers benefit American society. You can talk-trash me, but I really don’t care. I’m proud to be a Full-Time RVer!

Advertisements
A funeral party on campsite #1 ~ Yes, really!

A funeral party on campsite #1 ~ Yes, really!

After I explain that I am a Full-Time RVer and what that means, the second round of questioning usually involves how boring it must be to live in a campground.

Honestly, I am surprised that Hollywood hasn’t picked up on the idea of a campground as a site for a reality TV show. I’ve seen more action, drama and comedy from our RV kitchen window than Hollywood can dish out!

I think one of the most amazing things I ever witnessed at a campground goes back to when I was a teenager. My family had a Coachmen motorhome at the time and we were vacationing (not Full-Timers yet!) at a campground on Lake Okeechobee (Florida). Our campsite was on the canal and we had our own boat dock. I was fishing from the dock while my parents were soaking up the Florida sun in their lawn chairs when we heard shouting coming from the boat ramp area. A friend of ours who was camped a few sites down ran over and told us that we didn’t want to miss the excitement. Curious, we headed down to the boat ramp area only to see a new boat (still attached to the trailer) and pickup truck slowly sink in the canal. The young man had “borrowed” his father’s new pickup and boat to go fishing. The ramp was slippery (I remember how scary it was for us to back our boat down with the motorhome) and he didn’t bother to engage the parking brake. The poor boat, still strapped to the trailer, didn’t have a chance! To this day I get a chuckle at the memory of that young man shaking his head saying, “I’m so grounded.”

One of the funniest things was to see a RV sink. Not just any RV – an American Eagle Motor Coach! It was actually my first year as a Full-Timer (and I was living alone in a RV resort in South Florida). I was preparing dinner and heard a commotion outside. I saw the motor coach backing into the empty site on the opposite corner. Immediately after backing into the site, the rear tires of the RV sank into the soft sand. His wife was yelling at him to pull forward, unfortunately, this buried it even deeper. By the time he got out of the motor coach, half of the back section was buried in sand.  It didn’t take long for a crowd to gather and offer help. The man started shoveling, trying to dig out the tires, while others found items to try to drive up on. After digging out the tires, the man started up the RV and tried to drive forward. Of course, this made it worse and once again, he was digging not only sand, but the boards that got broken during the attempt. When he made the second attempt, he took a tow chain that a fellow Camper offered and he had his wife get in their tow vehicle (which had been dropped prior to the backing) and start it up. She began backing their vehicle while he drove forward in the RV. Needless to say, the language was rather colorful after that attempt! Another Camper offered to use his 3/4 ton Chevy truck to pull the RV forwarded and that did work. Once he had the motor coach back in the street, he ordered his wife to walk every campsite first. It was hilarious watching her walk nearby available sites, stomping the ground madly, as if that would prove the ground wouldn’t sink their RV. Unfortunately during all this, I didn’t think about getting it on video. I’m pretty sure that would have gotten me $10,000 quite easily!

One day while living at a Florida RV resort we saw a brand-new motorhome drive by. We could hear Campers already going over to see if the new arrivals needed assistance and we continued eating. Suddenly we heard the motorhome backing up and then a load crash. We bolted from the picnic table only to see a group gather around the back end of the motorhome. The man hit a palm tree and the RV “bounced” forward. While a crowd gathered around to help, they really didn’t – as they were too busy talking to the man’s wife commenting on how beautiful their new motorhome was! No one was even watching him back-up! Fortunately the palm tree was spared. 😉

I could literally write a book (or a soap opera) on campground living, but the one thing I never, ever thought I would witness in a campground is a funeral. Not only that, but one right outside our living room! We were staying in Washington at the time and our campground was on the edge of a historic cemetery. The very first site of the campground actually overlooked the cemetery. We were camped two sites away from it, but joked that we had “dead quite” neighbors. As it turned out, during our last week there, a member of one of the local tribes passed away and was buried in the cemetery. They held his funeral party on the first campsite. Since it was a chilly day, they even started a campfire. (That’s our rig in the photo above.)

From seeing pot-bellied pigs in tutus (with their own tents I might add) to watching a man wrestle a wayward gator, I would never consider living in a campground boring!

IN MY SITES: A Campground Mystery (Book #4)

In My Sites
In My Sites
A Campground Mystery
By HS Cooper
Photo book

DYING TO WORK CAMP (Book #3)

Dying to Work Camp
Dying to Work ...
A Campground Mystery
By HS Cooper
Photo book
Follow Three Modern Nomads on WordPress.com

Enter address to receive select posts via email. Please note, you must return to the site to see other content and updates.

THE PROPANE GAME (Book #2)

The Propane Game
The Propane Game
A Campground Myster...
By HS. Cooper
Photo book

Archived Posts

A ‘CLASS A’ STASH (Book #1)

A 'Class A' Stash
A 'Class A' Stash
A Campground Myster...
By HS. Cooper
Photo book
Help Veterans! The Veterans Site

Page Links

October 2019
S M T W T F S
« Nov    
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  

A THOUSAND WORDS: Photos from life on-the-road

Photos from life on...
By H.S. Cooper

ON THE ROAD TO DISASTER

On the Road to Disaster
On the Road to...
How to prepare for ...
By H.S. Cooper
Photo book
Advertisements